Last edited by Fenrim
Monday, May 18, 2020 | History

2 edition of Hydrolysis and biological degradation of atrazine in soils found in the catalog.

Hydrolysis and biological degradation of atrazine in soils

H. D. Skipper

Hydrolysis and biological degradation of atrazine in soils

by H. D. Skipper

  • 388 Want to read
  • 12 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Herbicides -- Toxicology.,
  • Soil pollution.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Horace Dean Skipper.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination[12], 70 leaves, bound :
    Number of Pages70
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14252745M

      Recently, soil pH has been implicated as a factor in enhanced degradation of atrazine in different soils (Houot, ). This hypothesis has been supported by recent reports of high enzymatic activity (Acosta-Martinez & Tabatabai, ) and higher bacterial activity at higher soil pH ( Cited by:   Degradation Process a) Biological decomposition or degradation 1) soil microorganisms 2) plants b) Chemical decomposition 1) hydrolysis in the soil or even spray tank 2) oxidation, etc. c) Photodecomposition 1) breakdown by sunlight Biological Degradation a. Algae, fungi, actinomycetes, and bacteria I. May use herbicide for N, C, S source II.

    Dissipation of atrazine (2-chloro thylaminoisopropylamino-s- triazine) in a Webster clay loam soil (fine loamy, mixed, mesic Typic Haplaquoll), and Estherville sandy loam (sandy, mixed, mesic typic Hapludoll) was determined over a concentration range of 5 to mg kg-1 in field and laboratory experiments. Over the first 6 mo in the clay loam soil, the persistence of atrazine (based on Cited by: Pesticide degradation is the process by which a pesticide is transformed into a benign substance that is environmentally compatible with the site to which it was applied. Globally, an estimated 1 to million tons of active pesticide ingredients are used each year, mainly in percent are herbicides, followed by insecticides and fungicides.

    This shortened the extrapolation to the pH values of field conditions, and guaranteed the absence of doubly‐protonated atrazine. Because spectrophotometry has been regarded as a controversial method for studying the hydrolysis kinetics of the 1,3,5‐triazine herbicides, this method was re‐ by: The value of the degradation is given by half-life DT Half-life DT 50 is a measure of the amount of time it takes for 50 percent of the parent compound to disappear from soil or water by transformation. The important degradation processes are biological processes (biodegradation) and physicochemical processes (hydrolysis, photolysis, etc.).


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Hydrolysis and biological degradation of atrazine in soils by H. D. Skipper Download PDF EPUB FB2

Detoxification of atrazine in soils results from both chemical hydrolysis and microbial degradation. Infrared analysis was used to study the hydrolysis of atrazine upon interaction with soil colloids and to ascertain the existence of enol, keto, and protonated-keto forms of : H.

Skipper. Atrazine degradation followed first‐order kinetics in soil‐free, sterilized soil and perfusion systems. An increased rate of atrazine hydrolysis in an acid soil was consistent with the effect of pH on hydrolysis.

No microbial degradation of atrazine was detected following inoculation of a soil‐free atrazine. Hybrid poplar showed potential for remediation of atrazine-contaminated soil, and the degradation of atrazine in the rhizosphere was faster than that in non-rhizosphere soil.

Atrazine significantly inhibited bacteria growth in non-rhizosphere soil. The high concentration of bacteria in the hybrid poplar rhizosphere might be key to atrazine degradation. Trends of change among fungi and actinomyces did not correspond to trends in atrazine degradation Author: Bin Yao, Xuejing Gu, Ying-ge Shu, Fang Bao, Yonghua Li.

Abstract. Graduation date: Detoxification of atrazine in soils results from both chemical\ud hydrolysis and microbial degradation.\ud Infrared analysis was used\ud to study the hydrolysis of atrazine upon interaction with soil\ud colloids\ud and to ascertain the existence of enol, keto, and protonated-keto\ud forms of hydroxyatrazine.\ud Evolution of ¹⁴CO₂ from ¹⁴C-atrazine\ud and.

Diffusion and degradation of atrazine in a water/sediment system. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry19 (8), DOI: /etc Sabine Houot, Edward Topp, Abdellah Yassir, Guy Soulas.

Dependence of accelerated degradation of atrazine on soil pH in French and Canadian by: Atrazine (2‐chloro‐4‐ethylamino‐6‐isopropylamino‐s‐triazine) and its degradation products are important contaminants of world water systems and have effects on aquatic effects are modulated by the degradation of atrazine, which depends, in part, on its reactivity with soil by: The hydrolysis, degradation and adsorption of herbicide atrazine were measured in two soil aquatic suspensions and in their mixtures with fly ash in small amounts (–%) and for.

Long-term survival of the consortium and degradation of atrazine to hydroxyatrazine were both enhanced in rhizosphere soil, but corn seedlings had no significant effect on the rate of atrazine. Review Article MICROBIAL DEGRADATION OF ATRAZINE, COMMONLY USED HERBICIDE Evy Alice Abigail, M.

& Nilanjana, Das School of Biosciences and Technology, VIT University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India ABSTRACT Atrazine is one of the most environmentally prevalent s-triazine groups of herbicides used for the control of broad leaf weeds in corn and sorghum. Chemical hydrolysis and microbial metabolism are two main pathways of atrazine degradation (Houot et al., ).

From 0 to 28 d, there was no significant difference in atrazine degradation between sterilized and unsterilized soils, which indicated that atrazine was degraded mainly through chemical hydrolysis in this : He Huang, Chaolan Zhang, Qun Rong, Chuangzhang Li, Jun Mao, Yu Liu, Junxian Chen, Xutong Liu.

the hydrolysis product of atrazine, is strongly bound to soil, while Schiavon () indicated that hydroxyatrazine formed practically no soil-bound residues.

By conducting laboratory studies under controlled conditions, it is possible to get a better understanding of the com-parative_ fate of atrazine and its degradation products in by: 3. Persistence of atrazine in soil and subsurface environments plays a major role in biodegradation of atrazine by the microorganisms.

However, atrazine can be degraded mainly by biological processes N-dealkylation, dechlorination, and ring cleavage (Struthers et al., ).Cited by: The sulfonylurea herbicides are degraded by simple hydrolysis if soil pH is acidic. As pH approaches neutrality, or under basic conditions, enzymatic degradation by microorganisms dominates.

Degradation in acidic soils is more rapid because of the high rate of acid hydrolysis. Purchase Pesticides in the Soil Environment - 1st Edition. Print Book & E-Book.

ISBNBook Edition: 1. Atrazine at and mg kg −1 may have increased soil microbial growth and activity and thus increased the degradation of atrazine based on the increase in soil respiration in the clay loam soil.

Degradation pathways in both soils apparently were not influenced by concentration. Ring cleavage and hydrolysis were the major metabolic. Herbicide degradation in soil and plants. PRINCIPLE AND PRACTICES OF WEED MANAGEMENT Topic: Herbicide degradation in Soil and Plant Presented by, Poojitha.K.

Jnr MSc.(Ag)Agronomy 2. HERBICIDE DECOMPOSITION/FATE IN SOILS Quite often herbicides are applied directly to soils for control of weeds.

Adsorption and desorption of pesticides on soils are the main retention phenomena that determine their transport, transformation, and biological effects in soil environments (Barriuso et al., ). For example, atrazine is moderately up to highly mobile in soils, especially where soils have low clay or organic matter content (Barriuso and Cited by: Sulfonylureas are a unique group of herbicides used for controlling a range of weeds and some grasses in a variety of crops and vegetables.

They have been extremely popular worldwide because of their low mammalian toxicity, low use rate, and unprecedented herbicidal activity. Knowledge about the fate and behavior of sulfonylurea herbicides in the soil-water environment appears to be of utmost Cited by: Atrazine is not normally found below the first foot of soil, even after years of continuous use.

Chemical hydrolysis, followed by degradation by soil microorganisms probably account for most of the breakdown of atrazine in soil.

Hydrolysis is rapid in acidic or. Arthur EL, Perkovich BS, Anderson TA, Coats JR () Degradation of an atrazine and methoachlor herbicide mixture in pesticide-contamianted soils from two agrochemical dealerships in Iowa. Water Air Soil Pollut –Cited by:. The atrazine degradation in sterile and non-sterile soils was measured by HPLC.

Soils were inoculated with both bacteria separately, with their respective non-inoculated controls. After 20 days, more than 20% of the atrazine had been degraded in the sterile soil inoculated with Pseudomonas cedrella BS4, and more than 30% in the non-sterile soil.

Chemical hydrolysis was considered to be the most dominant pathway in the degradation of aldicarb in subsoil in one of the published papers; all other investigations considered the degradation of pesticides in subsoil to be primarily microbiological.

Only a few of the investigations measured the biomass or biological activity of the subsoil Cited by: Biological and non-biological hydrolysis of atrazine in soil occurred simultaneously and essentially at equal rates and depended largely on soil pH soil ph Subject Category: Properties see more details and time.

However, the response to soil pH in atrazine hydrolysis by clay-organic separates or whole soil was primarily due to their o.m. by: 1.